Crecy – a one-shot comic about the 1346 slaughter at Crecy in France by the English

Crecy, comic cover

I’m not a historian but do have a passing interest in both history and comics. Recently I read Crecy by Warren Ellis which is an overview of the Battle of Crecy, as told down the lenses to the reader by a racist lout English bowman.

And it’s really worth a read, but some aspects play to particular tastes.

In short – it’s good.

I’m glad to have read it and was also interested to see how the writer and artist took a very confined scope and brought a story into it. The reasons and backstory is glossed behind the view of the main character, with enough context to allow the story to land on the page.

Crécy is a graphic novel written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Raulo Cáceres, depicting some of the events surrounding the historical Battle of Crécy. The graphic novel was published in 2007…

For – Arts style (a) suits the period darn well. In fact it is beautifully matched to the setting. There is no overstylised covering of the panels or tricks, and reflections of art from the period is used in places to make a counter illustration style very effective. The use of black and white makes the mud and blood mix, and the gore is stark. I really like the art, it’s a key reason the comic is very accessible.

To the camera voice (b) of the main character is very useful to draw in the reader, as is the modern language used to the reader as constructed to the language of the character when they are “on-stage”. His narration does help join the story together so that the reader follows all the events; although it’s not a complex story.

Panel transitions are clever (c) and the story moves very well. It’s also a good primer on the battle (d) which fed to my interests and the level of detail in the maps and tangential information is great. I’ve no idea if they’re accurate but they are well suited.  Continue reading

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